Wednesday, 18 July 2018

TO THE HAIKU UNIVERSE AND BELONG



spring
the insistence
of a wren

This perfect miniature poem is by John Rowlands who lives at Tremadoc, just a few miles away from the National Writers' Centre of Wales (Ty Newydd, Llanystumdwy) where I spent last weekend. John Rowlands kindly donated a copy of his book knots of sand (Alba 2017) to each of us on the course.

When I told a friend of mine I was going on a haiku weekend she said "primary school poetry", but I'm pleased (and relieved) to say that I discovered from our tutors, Philip Gross and Lynne Rees, that there is much more to haiku than the juniors' classroom.

I had always thought of haiku as being in the 5/7/5 syllable format. This came into English from the classical Japanese form of 5 characters followed by 7 characters followed by 5 characters.  But Lynne pointed out that the characters were written vertically and they were not necessarily single syllables.  As well as words they could represent punctuation or instructions in how to speak the poem.

The weekend was titled Journeys into Haiku in Verse and Prose. Haiku provided a spring-board for our writing, rather than a straight-jacket.  We didn't have to stick to syllable counting or to three lines - we were aiming for that elusive moment conveyed in very few words.

We began with Lynne's "haiku generator".  We were given two pages of found phrases from poems and invited to combine them in pairs and see what emerged:

the room reflected in a window
homesick now for middle age

I knew that at some point there would be a renga - a kind of verbal tennis with two or more participants (in our case three - maybe a different sport would be a better analogy?).  I started off with 

captured in a moment
the hare
trapped in wood

inspired by the hare carved on a wooden beam in the Ty Newydd dining room.  Our poem travelled a circuitous route via river, sea and slate, children and old men, to end with Philip Gross's final couplet:

the hare set running in the wood
is running still

Haiku can be opened out into a longer poem - we were given the example of Billy Collins' poem "Japan", a meditation with variations on Buson's 18th century haiku

on the temple bell
a moth has settled
and is sleeping

We were encouraged to experiment with combining haiku and prose (haibun) - a form in which the distillation of the poetry and the clarity of prose can complement each other.  An afternoon walk down to the Dwyfor estuary was a great time to gather material (both linguistic and physical - wool, driftwood, feather, stone).  This is my first draft:

gate
path
pebbles
sea

blue gate
path
pebbles
sea

open gate
path to the shore
blue pebbles
sea

step through the gate
follow the blue path
pebbles lie on the shore
obstinate
sea

The stock fencing divides the landscape into little postcards of blues and greens.  Earth square makes me think of the carousel of colour charts in a paint shop where they will mix any shade as requested.  The fence has smaller squares near the ground to keep in the lambs and larger squares to keep in their mothers.  Stands of wool catch on the wire and spiders thread nets over the airy spaces.  In winter the sea flings storm-fulls of bladderwrack against the wire.

And that's as far as I got.

On Saturday night we had the usual participants' reading.  I read my traditionally formed Shetland haiku, entitled "Island" (we never discussed whether haiku should have titles).  (I should point out that "boost" is a place to draw up a boat out of the water.)


stone boost by the shore
boat's bow across earth's fiddle
sea in a man's eyes

salt water hones stone
sound-washed air blows in the sun
a woman leaves home

As there were twelve of us it was a good opportunity to read round my "Kalends" haiku.  Here is July:


as you climb the path
heather purples the hillside,
clothes the lonely stones

A most inspiring and enlightening week-end at Ty Newydd.  Thank you, Lynne.  Thank you, Philip.

On Twitter Lynne has tweeted some lovely pictures of the weekend together with her exquisite prose fragments: go to @hungrywriting






Sunday, 1 July 2018

A FESTIVAL BETWEEN SKY AND SEA

I have crawled out at last
far as I dare on to a bough
of country that is suspended
between sky and sea

R S Thomas "Retirement"

This weekend I attended the festival held (mainly) in Aberdaron to celebrate the life and work of R S Thomas and his painter wife, M E (Elsi) Eldridge.  It is this westerly tip of North Wales that is most associated with the poems of R S Thomas.  As you drive down the steep lanes which lead to the village which ends at the sea, it is indeed a place suspended between sky and sea.  The festival went very well, thanks to the excellent organisation by Susan Fogarty (thank you, Susan!).  Here are some of my highlights.  (This is not an exhaustive list - there were a few events I couldn't attend).

Day 1:Thursday

The festival started with a fish and chip supper and an open mic poetry evening.  I'm not a great fan of open mics but I enjoyed this fairly low key one (that's a compliment) - no one tried to do a star cabaret turn!  Having been asked over the salt and vinegar, "Who were the Miss Keatings?" I read my Mirehouse "Beech Trees" poem and followed it with Gillian Clarke's "Fires on Lleyn" for its R S Thomas allusions and local geography.  Other participants read a good selection of poems, including Michael Longley's "Ceasefire" which echoed Clarke's allusion to The Troubles.  It's always interesting to see the apparently random connections which come up at open mic nights!

Day 2: Friday

The morning started with a visit, in the company of Llifon Jones, to Sarn Cottage at Rhiw (where R S Thomas wrote many of his later poems).  Llifon is the National Trust head gardener at Plas yn Rhiw.  The garden has been much neglected in recent years but now there are plans to restore it - with a light touch to provide good habitat for wild flowers and animals (the subjects of some of Elsi's paintings).  The views of the wide bay at Porth Neigwl were spectacular and I thought of R S Thomas's poem "Sea-watching":

                " ... There were days,
so beautiful the emptiness
it might have filled."

In the afternoon the sailing club meeting room was filled with an attentive audience listening to the American academic, Daniel Westover, speaking on the unusually titled "R S Thomas: Poetic Astronaut of God Space".  He spoke for two and a half hours (including 10 minutes questions).  I was most impressed with his meticulous scholarship which looked in close detail at the craft of  R S Thomas's poems (an aspect of his work which I have always admired). and how it reinforces and illuminates their meaning.

He gave an example from "The New Mariner".  The first line of the poem is

"In the silence"

and the line ends with silence - no following words on that line just the silence of the white paper.  Further down the poem are the words

"But there is the void
over my head and the distance
within ..."

The line breaks and white space after "void" and "distance" enact the meaning of the words and the void is visually "over my head" in the lineation of the poem.

In the evening Glyn Edwards shared his appreciation of R S Thomas's poetry in the atmospheric story-telling space of Porth y Swnt.  It was good to hear Jack Rendell, a young Aberystwyth graduate student read some of his work.

Day 3: Saturday

It was back to the sailing club on Saturday afternoon for Sam Perry's lecture on the relationship between the work of Ted Hughes and that of R S Thomas.  Two aspects that emerged were that both poets were rewriting creation myths (or myths of the fall?) and both did not shy away from the problematic subject of violence in the natural world.

In the evening there was standing room only in St Hywyn's church, Aberdaron, for a concert by Cor Meibion Carnguwch and harpist Morfudd Parry Roberts.  Cor Meibion Carnguwch grew out of a small group of Young Farmers singing for a competition.  They are now a fine young male voice choir with a varied repertoire of Welsh music.  They clearly enjoyed singing and were very good at it.  The applause at the end said it all - they had touched our hearts.

[You can hear my poem on Youtube by googling Mary Robinson reads Beech Trees]

For more about the R S Thomas and M E Eldridge Society go to
www.rsthomaspoetry.co.uk
or check out the Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/groups/RSThomas/